Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Helpful Tips for Actors, Presenters and Basically Anyone Facing an Audience!

Helpful Tips for Actors, Presenters and Basically Anyone Facing an Audience!No matter your profession, having an audience to please, inform or entertain can be an intimidating position to be in! Whether you are an actor, presenter or comedian, you deserve helpful tips to keep your time in the spotlight smooth and confident!  The New York Acting School for Film and Television is here to equip you for just such an occasion.

Helpful tips for basically anyone facing an audience:
  • Good presentations require great preparation, but do not start by writing your presentation out like an essay. Caroline Goyder, a former acting coach at the Central School of Speech and Drama who helps business leaders to communicate effectively says, "Writing it down tempts you to just read it out, which gives a dead, impersonal delivery."
  • Practice well and often into an audio or video recorder so you get used to what you sound and look like to an audience. Then deliver it to a small live audience of colleagues, friends or family and be open to constructive feedback. This is a very helpful tool.
  • If you are a speaker or presenter, always have a visual tool to back up your key points, but try to be original and not stick to just using Powerpoint with words and graphs. Ed Brodow once beat up a rubber chicken as part of a presentation. It's crazy and odd, but people remembered it.
  • When Anthony Hopkins was playing serial killer Hannibal Lecter in Silence of the Lambs, he used a technique called personalization  that helped him convey the inner anger of Hannibal by reaching into his own experiences of anger that he actually felt like killing someone. (we're all glad he didn't, right?) But you can use this technique and tap into your own emotional experiences to bring their impact and authenticity into your performance and presentation. 
  • When it's time to deliver you big point or climax, take it slowly. Ewan McGregor has been said to deliver one thought at a time. Putting pauses between each thought helps you slow down. This is useful as nerves tend to speed up speech. Imagine you are delivering each point to one member of the audience and wait until you can see from their face that they have got it. This is a technique used by stand-up comedians.
  • Lastly, here is one tip you can try out right now. Many television and radio professionals use this technique to ensure that they come across as twinkling, charming and friendly. Affirm yourself with positive truth statements such as, "I'm beautiful; someone loves me; I have a secret." Keeping that in mind, say what you have to say.  Try it now with the next person you speak to. It really works.
The New York Acting School for Film and Television loves to see you confidently set up for success. Whatever your need, from better presenting to on camera comfort, we are here to support you with classes and coaching. Call us today!

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