Friday, July 21, 2017

Acting Etiquette Every Actor Must Master to Succeed in Their Careers

Acting Etiquette Every Actor Must Master to Succeed in Their CareersMany actors would like to think that succeed at the game of entertainment is a simple as getting up in front of people and entertaining them. But it’s not. And in fact, those that feel that way end up forever being rejected for parts or being passed over because they fail to put in the time and effort needed for proper success.

At the New York Acting School for Film and Television, we pride ourselves in properly preparing our students for the success they’re looking for in the world of acting. We don’t just focus on the practice, although we do plenty of it, but we also focus on the more detailed skills you need to master to be seen, booked and starred. And today’s detail is all around etiquette; how you perform on screen, in front of the camera and before the audience. Nail these and you’ll skyrocket your talent and credibility faster than you might realize.

Etiquette on screen. Always keep going until the director shouts “Cut!” and then keep on acting for a bit. We feel that when we make a mistake that we should stop, but that instinct will not further your career. If you mess up a line, keep going until the director call a halt to the take. Let it be HIS decision. The mistake may be just what the scene needs.

Do not stop a take for any reason, except for possible injury or death. Sounds harsh, but take it seriously. The director makes the call. Every time.

Regarding your body, there are some helpful tips to keep in mind about your eyes, your posture and placement. Be sure to never look directly into the camera lens unless specifically requested to do so. Being in the right place is often more important than saying the right line. Maintain your concentration and eye lines all through the tedium of lineup and rehearsal; it helps both your fellow actors and the crew.
Lastly, and this one is more for booking, never say you do not want to play a role; say that you are unavailable. Never say “No,” say “Maybe” instead. It keeps you more available for future consideration.


Etiquette and the Camera. This one has a lot of small points that I’m just going to pour through for the sake of both our time. They’re simple but powerful so take each of them seriously.

Generally, ignore the camera lens; let it discover you. Staring at or looking for the camera lens will make you look like an amateur. Remember it’s presence and honor your placement, but also pretend it isn’t there. If both your eyes cannot “see” the camera lens, your face will appear to be obscured.
Keep on an imaginary narrow path that stretches out from the front of the camera.

Remember that shots are composed in depth, not width. In a 3-shot, put the lens in the middle of the gap, not yourself. If you have trouble hitting a mark, line up 2 objects at the final position you have to hit. Establish a “web.”

As for your posture, keeping your shoulders angled toward the camera often look better than straight-on ones. It’s better for your body as well as the believability of the scene. 

Of course, the New York Acting School for Film and Television is always here to help you improve your skills and to prepare you for acting success with our acting classes,  coaches and more! Please call today to see how we can better your career!

Monday, July 17, 2017

Use This Quick Checklist to See if You Really Have What It Takes to Make It In Acting!

Sure, you want to be an actor. You’re great at it. You’ve got talent and you can see yourself going the distance and claiming your fame down the red carpet. But the entertainment industry isn’t just a field of roses. There are challenges to overcome, skills to learn and a lot of rejection. So the real question you need to ask yourself is if you can keep to the road when it gets tough. That’s why we at the New York Acting School for Film and Television gathered together this “will I make it” list for you to see where you’re strong and where you need to apply yourself more. Because we want you to make it. And we know that if you want it bad enough, you’ll do what it takes to get there.

Do you:

  • overthink your role?
  • stress about landing the part?
  • fear that others are succeeding faster than you?
  • see acting as work more than play?
  • find yourself desperately taking low end jobs and then complaining about it?
  • beat yourself off for not performing perfectly?
  • dream about the red carpet, money and glory more than the experience?

You can’t overthink the role. Acting is about studying and embodying; becoming, not over analyzing. So if you find yourself over thinking - it’s time to get into a new class that helps you hone in on your skill as well as loose yourself to the role.

Stressing about landing the part will get you nowhere. You will be rejected more often than you’re chosen. It’s not personal - it’s just a very particular art. Trust that you will be perfect for certain roles and as long as you’re showing up as you at your best, you’ll get the roles you’re meant for.

Some people will succeed faster than you - but don’t compare yourself or get bitter about it. If anything, learn from it. See what they’re doing that you’re not, or where they’re gifted that you could stand to have more education or practice and then do something about it.

When actors see it too much as a job, they lose their love for the art. Don’t let this happen to you. Keep it fun, keep your passion alive and see the good in each experience.

In the end, you are the leader here and sometimes leading is about allowing the path to unfold. Other times it’s about educating yourself and it’s just about always about being thankful for where you’re at. But in the end, if you have the right intention for succeeding (you love it) and you’re humble and committed to learning - you’ll go far.

At the New York Acting School for Film and Television, we know you want to succeed. But we also knows the very habits that hold you back. So we focus on helping you excel while keeping it fun and keeping your love of acting alive! We hope you'll join us for one of our many classes and other offerings in New York City as you continue on the path to acting success!

Saturday, July 8, 2017

How Method Acting It Can Skyrocket Your Success as an Actor or Performer!

How Method Acting It Can Skyrocket Your Success as an Actor or Performer! Every actor has his or her own way of developing their character. There are some ways that require more practice and some that require embodiment. That’s what I want to share with you today and I want to focus on the idea of embodiment. At the New York Acting School for Film and Television, we understand the need for mastering different skills.

Today, I want to focus on what’s so great about method acting and why I believe you should master it. Does that mean you can only act using method acting? Not at all. But it’s proven itself to be a useful form and the more useful tools you’ve got in your box, the more likely you are to succeed, right? 

Method acting actually involves a series of approaches but its overall aim is to develop believable performances by teaching the actor to embody and replicate the emotional experience of the character through his or her own emotions.

So what are the key points to method acting? They’re pretty simple and once you read through them, I think you’ll get the picture and know if it’s right for you. 

Acting Using Emotional Memory As Your Fuel and Inspiration The key to the method acting approach is the shift away from the actor’s portrayal of emotion toward the actor’s internalization of that emotion. The actor is expected to feel the emotion rather than simply pantomime it. This process is typically enabled by the memory of a past event within the actor’s own life that triggers the same emotion.

Character Framing - This is where you draw from and portray more lifelike and believable characters instead of just caricatures and exaggerations from theatrical inspiration. The method acting approach focuses on the portrayal of lifelike and “believable” characters rather than theatrical caricatures. The actor is expected to readjust the way s/he thinks and feels to fit the portrayal of the character.

Experience and Personal Motivation With this perspective, the actor needs to ask a series of questions to determine motivation: how would the character react in the given situation? What situations would need to occur to motivate the character in a particular direction? What events would trigger particular emotions within the character.

Observation and Mimicking  – With this one, a very popular one, you want to make the most of your time people watching so that you can really observe how the character’s real life counterparts might move and operate in the world. Where do they go? Who do they interact with? How do they interact? Think of who they might be in real life, watch those people and consider the rippling dynamics and how you can embody them.

Of course, that’s just a summary, but I’m sure you can tell that it’s a useful skill to dive into and have at your disposal.  To learn more about Method Acting, and other forms of character development, please contact us at the New York Acting School for Film and Television today. We have many classes and coaches waiting for you to take the step toward bettering your career.

Sunday, July 2, 2017

How to Get Noticed as a Pro Actor in an Industry Saturated With Talent

How to Get Noticed as a Pro Actor in an Industry Saturated With TalentYou’ve already put in the work of perfecting your trade, but you’re afraid you’re just not standing out enough. You need to be noticed, seen above the rest and booked for being the best, right? It’s not easy, it’s a crowded industry. But there are ways to be noticed if you do it right. And we are here to help you. At the New York Acting School for Film and Television, we specialize in taking people with talent and developing them in the ways necessary to succeed in their dreams at any size. One thing we’ve learned, is that in order to get paid and win in this industry, you have to stand out. Let’s talk about how to do this.

If you want to be booked like a pro, you need to be seen as one. This means people have to see you as an expert at your trade. So what else can you do to get even better? To learn more? To take it even further? 

Start by reading, asking and listening. You want to research everything you can on your way up the ladder. Grab a handful of books on the acting business, watch youtube tutorials, talk to other successful actors and meet with as many people in the industry as possible (directors, grips, stage managers, producers, agents, editors, etc.). Ask questions, pick their brains and write it all down.  Then send them a thank you card, buy them a coffee and show your gratitude.

Shadow those you admire. Interview a working actor who's career is where you’d like to have yours be one day have.  Study their career road map well, and the knowledge will save you from unnecessary surprises and disappointments later on.

Be resilient. You’re not the only talented one out there. You’re good, but there are many out there with the same level of skill, experience or talent as you. So you’ve got to stick to your game and not get discouraged when the journey gets rough. What you NEED most is the right state of mind, your talent, persistence, flexibility and a love for what you do BECAUSE you love it. Success beyond that is a bonus AND is more likely to come, when you are not longer desperate to make it happen.

Represent yourself right. Head Shots are your number one advertisement which means it's quality needs to be a priority. So don't go cheap here. I'm not saying you have to spend a fortune on them, but you do need to find a photographer who knows how to bring out your best qualities and features.

Get properly trained. Never stop learning. Take classes or study at a university with a good drama  or performing arts program. If you'd like to get to the film and television industry, go take some classes at a location that specializes in those areas. In addition to acting, take courses in literature, psychology, history and philosophy.  Creating a broad liberal arts

Always be networking. You never know who you’re going to meet, so get out there! Agents and directors work with those actors that they know, like, and trust. So meet everyone and make sure people know you. Be respectful, positive and professional at all times though! Don't let the reputation of networking cause you to feel impersonal and false.  You are in charge of your authenticity. Rather, think of it as building a community of people who can support you in your aspirations. And you support them too. Pay it forward. The more advocates you have out there, they more work you’ll be offered.

In the end, you want to make sure to leave a lasting memory in people's minds of your punctuality, determination and positive mindset.  Be a friend and be wise.  Be humble and never stop learning. Ever.

For more information, talk to us at the New York Acting School for Film and Television and let us know how we can help you succeed.






Thursday, June 29, 2017

How to Speak Confidently in Front of an Audience Without Freaking Out

How to Speak Confidently in Front of an Audience Without Freaking Out
It’s time for you to get up and show your best. But sweat is pouring down your face  and you don’t have time to be afraid. You need all the confidence you can muster because this is your chance, this is your day and this is your moment to shine! So you need to know more now than ever, how to walk on that stage and instead of freaking out - totally own it. That’s what we teach at the New York Acting School for Film and Television with our coaching and classes and we want to teach you too. So check out what we have to offer and in the meantime here are some simple ways to help you get on that stage more confidently than ever before.
Be properly prepared. This one is so important because when you’re properly prepared, you won’t be thinking about what you might have forgotten. Caroline Goyder, a former acting coach at the Central School of Speech and Drama who helps business leaders to communicate effectively says, "Writing it down tempts you to just read it out, which gives a dead, impersonal delivery."
Cheat as needed. Whether you’ve got it right there with you or if just behind the curtain, it’s good to have  some notes in bullet point form to help keep you on track. Additionally, if you’re a presenter, it’s good to use visual tools or storytelling to help make your point, keep you focused and keep your listeners engaged.
Make it personal. When Anthony Hopkins was playing serial killer Hannibal Lecter in Silence of the Lambs, he used a technique called personalization  that helped him convey the inner anger of Hannibal by reaching into his own experiences of anger that he actually felt like killing someone. (we're all glad he didn't, right?) But you can use this technique and tap into your own emotional experiences to bring their impact and authenticity into your performance and presentation.
Use a slower pace. There’s no need to rush. Rushing only increases anxiety. So when you are reaching a point of importance or dramatic climax, be sure to slow down or pause. The silence or change in flow gives the presentation contrast and dynamics; a must for all performance and art. Also try to imagining you are delivering to one member of the audience and wait until you can see from their face that they have got it. This is a technique used by stand-up comedians.
The New York Acting School for Film and Television loves supporting you as you pursue your dreams. For more information and guidance, call us today!

Friday, June 16, 2017

Are You Ready for an Acting Manager? Here’s What You Need to Know:

Are You Ready for an Acting Manager? Here’s What You Need to Know: Once you reach a certain point in your acting career, you start to wonder if it’s time to take it to the next level. And perhaps you’ve even been approached by a manager or agency. This is a good sign that you’re headed in the right direction, but there are still things to be aware of, and even be cautious of. And that’s what we’d like to discuss with you today. So take a minute and read through the tips to make sure the next step you take is the right one for you.  
First of all, what needs to be clear is the role of the manager. The manager’s main focus is to guide the actor's career and make connections for them; and although most of the best managers out there are former agents, the two have very different roles.
As great as that is, the dark side of the trade also needs to be spoken of. The most common scams in the entertainment industry usually involve people who call themselves managers, but have no legitimacy nor the professionalism or expertise to really help you further your career. That’s because acting management is not an occupation regulated by any of the actors unions. So sharks come in, promising you fame and fortune, but only for a fee paid upfront without any promise of results. 
Of course this is not true of all managers. But you should always be cautious and do your research before signing with a management company. Find out the names of other actors they represent and ask those actors about their experiences with the manager or company in question.
On a fee point, most management companies usually offer their services in exchange for a 15% commission, though it can sometimes be a little more. A legitimate manager will never ask for money up front. So if the ask for it upfront, run!
As for integrity, no manager should ever, under any circumstance, ask you to remove your clothing or engage in sexually explicit "scenes". This is illegal, unprofessional and you should walk away. 
Hoping to be discovered? The truth is, that’s rarely how it works. If an acting manager is legitimate, they likely won't approach an unknown actor. Of course that's the dream - to be discovered, but it's just not likely. A successful manager is already busy with experienced clients, and you'll have to work pretty hard to get their attention.
Acting is a great career, but be sure you are prepared to take the classes, meet the people and do your homework!  The New York Acting School for Film and Television wants to see you succeed! Call us today and let us know how we can further your dream.


Friday, June 9, 2017

The Best Way to Prepare for Any Performance or Presentation

The Best Way to Prepare for Any Performance or Presentation When it’s your turn to get up in front of a crowd and wow them into applause, you want to be ready and give it your best so you keep them wanting more. The New York Acting School for Film and Television is here to teach you just that. 
No matter what you do, every presentation is a performance and every performance is a presentation. You’re always selling a thought, idea, emotion or experience. And your job is to captivate your watchers so that they become transfixed and can’t wait to hear and see more. But how do you get there? We want to share with you the best way to prepare for your presentations and performance that keeps you feeling confident, prepared and prepped for success.
Start with a plan. Good presentations require great preparation, but do not start by writing your presentation out like an essay. Caroline Goyder, a former acting coach at the Central School of Speech and Drama who helps business leaders to communicate effectively says, "Writing it down tempts you to just read it out, which gives a dead, impersonal delivery."
When it applies, have visual support. If you are a speaker or presenter, always have a visual tool to backup your key points, but try to be original and not stick to just using Powerpoint with words and graphs. Ed Brodow once beat up a rubber chicken as part of a presentation. It's crazy and odd, but people remembered it. This allows for a multi-sensory experience and connection to both you and the message you’re sharing.
Practice as you. Practice well and often into an audio or video recorder so you get used to what you sound and look like to an audience. Then deliver it to a small live audience of colleagues, friends or family and be open to constructive feedback. This is a very helpful tool. Be sure to tap into your own emotional experiences to bring their impact and authenticity into your performance and presentation.
Slow down for the final delivery. When it's time to deliver you big point or climax, take it slowly. Putting pauses between each thought helps you slow down. This is useful as nerves tend to speed up speech. Imagine you are delivering each point to one member of the audience and wait until you can see from their face that they have got it. This is a technique used by stand-up comedians.
Imagine your success. This one is used by most successful people in the world.You simply spend a little time each day to visualize yourself confidently delivering and your crowd going wild with awe and applause. Imagine how it feels. Imagine you confidently delivering, remembering every line and point. Imagine being asked to come back and do it again!
The New York Acting School for Film and Television loves to see you confidently set up for success. Whatever your need, from better presenting to on camera comfort, we are here to support you with classes and coaching. Call us today!